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Tag Archives: Beef

2014 National Beef Ambassador Program: It started with a shiny belt buckle

BY MADISON MARTIN, Tennessee 

Originally posted: http://madisonsfarmadventures.blogspot.com/2013/10/2014-national-beef-ambassador-program.html

1383294_10151618665596526_1802338134_nOne sunny day at a cattle auction in Georgia a woman approached a girl in a shiny buckle…the woman, Mrs. Callaway, asked the girl about her buckle.  I don’t know how but Mrs. Callaway felt or heard the girls passion through her words describing her life on the farm.  What Mrs. Callaway had up her sleeve next changed that girl’s life, forever.  OK maybe a tad much exaggeration.  That girl was me and I was at that sale looking for replacement cows with my Pop.  Mrs. Callaway thought I was worthy to know about this program called the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) and she also told me that Tennessee didn’t have a program.  Duhh Duhh Duhh. I went home without any new cows but with information that could change the course of my life.
A side story, before I had heard about NBAP I wanted to work in the CIA. Now I wanted to be a Bovine geneticist/nutritionist/ some reproduction and an embryologist.  That’s a lot right!! Back to the story…..
Well, I pursued this program but not before I forgot our conversation many times.  I actually forgot and then finally remembered our conversation about a month before the contest!  Not having an official contest in my state I had to find someone in the beef community to write me a letter of recommendation. I choose Mrs. Houston a very influential cattlewoman in my area whom I look up to greatly.  She got the letter written, we sent off the registration, and BAM I was on my way to the Wooster, Ohio 2012 NBAP contest. Look at the NBAP page.  They do their contest with the next years date because that’s how the team will serve.  The Beef Ambassador contest has two divisions: senior and junior.  The junior division ages from 12-16, I was in that division. The seniors age from 17-21.  There were two parts of the contest I had to participate in: consumer demonstration and media interview.  I had the time of my life! That year we toured Certified Angus and Weaver Leather!!  I couldn’t believe that so many prominent members of the beef community were in attendance and it was an excellent trip. A big bonus for me were passionate friends I made for life.
Year 2012…September rolls around and my mom and I are talking about going again.  This year its in Sacramento, California.  That’s a long drive from Tennessee.  We decided to make it a family trip.  We visited every important site on I-40 from Tennessee to California.  Then we drove up the coast of California on the road that runs along the ocean to Sacremento for the contest.  We had five people crammed in a little rental  KIA.  We stopped along the way and saw all our family across the US.  When we finally arrived to Sacramento we were exhausted.  I couldn’t think about actually functioning let alone telling people about my farm.  Good thing it comes natural to me.  That year was probably the best. I knew the ropes and the people and what to look out for.
Year 2013…This years contest.  Tennessee finally got a contest! That made me super happy.  Long story short, I lost!  Now, I am glad I did though. It pushed me to be the best I could at this years contest in Springdale, Arkansas.  The home of one of my favorite cattlewomen! Geneice McCall, she is from a small town called Eureka Spring, Arkansas.  Anyways, the contest went on without a glitch.  I NOW thought this contest was the best!  I wonder if I can call them ALL the Best!   Why, yes, Yes I can! This is the third year I have gone and I tried with all my heart, soul, and mind to do the best I could do and make my mom and dad proud.  Before the awards ceremony I told my mom I didn’t care if  I placed because I knew I did the best I had done in a long time, I had fun with it all.  I made so many networking connections and I was proud of myself for what I had accomplished that weekend.
1379481_10151618665081526_1222568977_nThe awards ceremony…hmmm….I really can’t remember anything from it except I won consumer demonstration high individual! I then went on to receive second place. I was overjoyed. I was crying and shaking.  I thought all the juniors did fabulous. I didn’t think I could ever place but I did. You can watch some of the videoed contest here.

 

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CMT Encourages Followers to Go Meat-Free For a Day

By: Sarah Ryan, YPC Leadership Board

I was perusing my news feed on Facebook this morning (Oct.1) and came across this message from Advocates for Agriculture: “CMT started off today with an insulting tweet, asking people if they can go meat-free today for World Vegetarian Day. They may play country music but they obviously don’t understand much of anything about what happens out in the country.”

Time for an admission, I haven’t joined Twitter.  But, I did follow the link provided by Advocates for Agriculture to CMT’s tweet  and was impressed by how quickly the meat raising agriculture community started to tweet back.  Among the tweets was a call to boycott CMT.  Can’t say I disagree… but I’d have to start watching so I could quit.

I am most impressed by the constant message that 1. CMT should be supportive of ranching families and eating meat and 2. constant positive messaging that eating meat is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.  Obviously this exemplifies again that programs like MBA are working!  I’m really proud that agriculture has come so far (joining social media, etc.) and is ready with positive messages to promote our way of life.

Finally, I’m disappointed that companies, like CMT, have decided to promote one lifestyle choice over another.  As one person tweeted, (in my words) wouldn’t CMT’s tweet have been better spent talking about today as the start of pink month and awareness than promoting a meat-free diet…

How do you react to these types of messages?  Do you boycott any company that promotes meat-free days, especially meatless Mondays?

 

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Diary of a N. Ireland Girl

Young Farmers’ Clubs of Ulster member, Rachel Martin has just returned from her two month International Farm Youth Exchange (IFYE) to the U.S.A. The trip saw the Northern Irish farmer’s daughter leave Belfast on the 8th June and return on the 9th August traveling through a total of twelve states in a bid to learn about agriculture and culture in North America:

photo-25I was supposed to meet my first host the next day.  Sure, I had seen her photograph but there was still something daunting about the thought of meeting a stranger at a train station 6000 miles from home to go and live with them for three weeks.  The train was running late and I was worried about whether my host would even be there.  Besides, what if they were mean or creepy?  Counter to my worries Josie, my first host turned out to be very friendly and welcoming.  After all, she had volunteered to look after an international delegate and show them a little about her life and her work with 4-H in her county.

During my trip, I met and stayed with several families learning about life on their farms and ranches.   By staying with locals I quickly learned a lot about the USA, and not just the difference between chips, fries and crisps or the difficulties in ordering “proper tea” as opposed to iced tea.  But thanks to the in-depth learning experience provided by the exchange, I learned about family life, social faux pas, rocky mountain oysters – much more than a standard tourist could ever have discovered!

During my trip I have seen first-hand many of the agricultural challenges faced in the Western states.  In Northern Montana, I helped put out a hay field fire and just a few days later watched as hail tore up a year’s worth of hard work.  Unfortunately for the family, this was just part of farming in that area and something they had to be prepared for.  It made me reflect a lot on the challenges farmers face at home and that whilst my friends at home often grumble about the “bad weather” and seemingly endless rain, I soon discovered that as food producers our climate in Northern Ireland really isn’t the worst.

herding cattle

As part of her International Farm Youth exchange trip, Rachel helped herd cattle across McCartney Mountain in southwest Montana.

One of the most adrenalin inducing experiences of the trip was helping the Smith family to herd cattle across McCartney Mountain in south-west Montana.  As a girl who was never allowed a pony when she was younger because they “tramp up the fields” I found it interesting when many ranchers told me they find their horses to be more useful than their four wheelers.  Whilst in southwest Montana I also drove machinery for a few days to haul bales to the stack yard and enjoyed the work hard, play hard mentality on the ranch.  Along with my host siblings Jacob and Elizabeth I visited the Montana Folk Festival and got the drive in movie experience – something I loved and wish we had at home!

As part of the programme, I also met with 4-H children preparing their steers for the county fair as well as another group of children who were practising showing with their sheep and pigs.  I also was lucky enough to visit the State Fair in Great Falls and to go to different types of rodeos as well as seeing attractions such as Deadwood, Mount Rushmore, Virginia City, Crystal Park and Glacier National Park.

My trip started in New York where I spent a few days doing all the super touristy stuff before I jumped on a train and travelled to IFYE Orientation in Bloomington, Illinois to meet with other International delegates before I went on to stay with families for the rest of the trip.  I would like to thank all my host families, IFYE, 4-H and YFCU for facilitating the exchange and making it such a success.

The IFYE program is an in-depth learning experience in which 4-H alumni and other young adults live with host families in other countries to increase global awareness, develop independent study interests, and improve language skills. Programs vary from country to country, with some emphasizing an agricultural work experience, volunteering at an adult training centre, or working with a local youth development program such as 4-H or YFCU.  If you would like to read more about Rachel’s travels check out her blog http://www.youngfarmerinthestates.wordpress.com.

 

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